Polish prime minister pushes back on EU concerns over rule of law

Polish Prime Minister Beata Szydlo declared Friday that the country "would not allow others to impose their will" on her country amid pressure from the European Commission over Warsaw's judicial reforms.

"It's not Poland that has a problem with its reputation, it's the European Commission," the national-conservative politician said in a speech to the parliament Friday that elicited applause.

The commission has warned that it will issue a formal set of objections next week if substantial progress on several of its concerns about the conservative government's measures go unaddressed.

Poland's government, which took office in November, has come under criticism for laws that are designed to strengthen its grip on the constitutional court, as well as media reforms giving Warsaw a greater say over senior appointments to the public broadcasters.

Last update: Fri, 24/06/2016 - 08:49

More from Europe

Win expected for conservative opposition in Lithuania election

Lithuania went to the polls on Sunday in the second round of a parliamentary election expected to punish Prime...

Spanish Socialists resolve crisis as minority government looms

Spain is set to have its first fully functional government in 10 months after the centre-left Socialist Party (PSOE...

Stand-off with man in London flat hoarding "combustibles" ends safely

A three-day stand-off between British armed police and a man feared to be in possession of "combustible material" in...

German foreign minister says EU break-up is a real threat

The break-up of the European Union is a real possibility, warns German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier in...

Report: Three dead amid two gas blasts in Russia

A pair of gas explosions striking homes claimed at least three lives Sunday and left at least 20 wounded, according...