South Africa's Zuma appeals review of his corruption charges

South African President Jacob Zuma has filed an appeal against a recent high court decision that had cleared the way for him to be tried on almost 800 corruption charges, years after the charges had been dropped.

Zuma “is of a strong view that the court erred in several respects,” the presidency wrote in a statement released early Tuesday. The appeal was filed late Monday.

The decision to appeal was telegraphed in advance, after the country's state prosecutor announced he would take leave to appeal the judgement, a decision the country's main opposition party called a move to protect Zuma "at all costs."

Last month, a South African high court ruled that a 2009 decision by prosecutors to drop 783 corruption charges against Zuma must be reviewed. The opposition celebrated the ruling as a "victory for justice."

The National Prosecution Authority (NPA) cleared Zuma of charges of corruption, fraud and money laundering related to a multibillion-dollar arms deal three weeks before the 2009 elections. The decision allowed Zuma to run for president.

Last update: Tue, 24/05/2016 - 11:48

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